Alice Schwarzer Smacks Down Judith Butler

Alice Schwarzer (left), Judith Butler (right)

There were times when Alice Schwarzer featured gender studies icon Judith Butler in her magazine EMMA. Somehow feminism made its way into academia and without time to look at it in more detail she saw that as a good thing.

Alice Schwarzer, who was friends with late philosophers Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, has made a career of giving a voice to feminist causes in a manner everyone could understand it. Judith Butler, on the other hand, made a career out of obfuscation of her own views with obtuse, pseudo-academic language. One cause, two departments, in wait for a clash.

It started with the publication of an essay critical of “queer-feminism” by a hardly known author in Schwarzer’s magazine. Newspaper die ZEIT gave Butler, the prima donna of the discipline, the chance to address the accusations against her field of “studies”.

The result was an innuendo game, suggesting that Alice Schwarzer and her magazine were racist. Even Socialist newspaper taz wondered why indeed no arguments were given for Butler’s positions.

ZEIT was fair enough to allow Schwarzer to answer Butler in their news blog ZEIT online, which has a much larger audience than Schwarzer’s own magazine.

Schwarzer argues that Butler tries to pit the efforts in the fights against racism and sexism against one another, particularly when it comes to Islamism.

Butler’s proximity to Islamism is not new. The Jewish lesbian praised Hamas as a progressive movement and once accused all gays attending a pride march of islamophobia, culminating in her refusal to accept an undeserved award.

One woman, Schwarzer, is the face of feminism and yet has never fully treated it as a religion (though sometimes she was damn close). In doubt Schwarzer’s positions were always pro-women and pragmatic. The other woman, Butler, was not spearheading social campaigns, collecting money for good causes and making a difference. She rather served her narcissism by creating a community with speech codes, impervious to ideas from outside. Also Socialist taz noted that Butler’s article was indeed all about policing other people’s speech.

Schwarzer may be fired by Google for her attitude, but the comment section under her ZEIT onlineĀ  article clearly suggests that people from all political persuasions were putting down their misgivings about her and applauded her piece.

Views may differ and I might have written unjustly about Butler, but whatever her positions are we may ask for the respect of her giving arguments and not play with innuendos.

 

 

 

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